Marissa Eustaquio Play

Treating an overlooked heart condition

Marissa Eustaquio’s case was a mystery. After a strong recovery from heart surgery as a child, she’d been active for years, enjoying dancing, hula, gymnastics, running, and bike-riding.

Heart on a string Play

How does a heart defect start? Stanford scientists use stem cells to find out

For years, pediatric cardiologists have been trying to understand the origin of a puzzling congenital defect that creates a spongy texture in the heart muscle wall. Now, Stanford researchers have shown that they can use stem cell techniques to turn donated skin and blood cells from real patients into a useful tool for figuring out how the disease gets started.

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World-first treatment for rare heart defect saves baby born at Packard Children’s

Linda Luna was five months pregnant with her first child when she got the bad news: Ultrasound scans showed a deadly defect in her baby boy’s heart. He had a 90 percent chance of dying before or just after birth. But thanks to a groundbreaking treatment at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, two-month-old baby Liam, who just went home to San Jose last week, is beating those odds.

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From the Heart

Karina Gomez’s daughter, Kassaundra, was born in 2002 with a rare and life-threatening cardiac abnormality. At just 2 days old, Packard heart surgeons attached a tiny pacemaker to one of the two lower chambers, or ventricles, of her heart. Five months later, it was replaced it with a more advanced device wired to both ventricles.

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Growing for Tomorrow

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital is embarking on a transformative expansion project. Growth will allow Packard to continue to offer the most advanced cures, treatments, and technologies available, performed by the best minds in pediatric and obstetric medicine, within a state-of-the-art facility designed to meet the special needs of children and families.

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Three Days, Three Hearts

In an extremely rare three-day series of transplants in May, three young adults received new hearts at the Children’s Heart Center at Packard Children’s, including an extraordinarily uncommon double-organ heart and liver transplant.