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Rebounding from extraordinary challenges

When Ben Thornton wheeled onto the court for the Bay Area Outreach and Recreation Program’s youth wheelchair basketball West Coast Conference Championship at Stanford, it was a game he was certain to play with heart — the same heart, in fact, that he received at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford nearly 12 years ago.

Hospital School Play

A school away from school

The Hospital School provides four hours of class every day for students in kindergarten through twelfth grade, taught by accredited teachers.

Omar's Dream Play

Keeping kids connected thanks to one patient’s dream

When young patients move into Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford for treatment for cancer, transplant surgeries, or other acute conditions, their academic and social lives become secondary to their health needs. To bridge that gap, the Omar’s Dream Foundation is working with Packard Children’s to keep kids connected by donating laptops and other electronic devices that enable them to stay in contact with their classrooms and curriculum while in the hospital for extended periods of time.

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Trading cancer treatments for spa treatments – Packard Children’s teens get pampered at Girls’ Day Out

Laughter sounded through the hallways of the Tova Day Spa at the Fairmont San Jose hotel, and on the other side a group of patients from Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford were being pampered while discussing Netflix shows, playing games and brainstorming what to wear to prom this year. These may be normal topics of conversation for teens, but for girls undergoing cancer treatment, this day of fun, relaxation and spa treatments was a very welcome respite from their typical routines.

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“We’re all in this together”: Supporting adolescent mental wellness

The message was clear: “No one can do this alone.” Laura Roberts, MD, MA, chair of Stanford University School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences kicked off the first annual Adolescent Mental Wellness Conference by addressing a diverse crowd of advocates who are passionate about improving access to care and resources for mental health. “We’re all in this together,” she emphasized.

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Breaking down stigma: 5 things to know about our Adolescent Mental Wellness Conference

In response to the growing need for mental health resources for Bay Area adolescents and children, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford is joining the Stanford School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Services and Pediatrics Division of Adolescent Medicine to host the first annual Adolescent Mental Wellness Conference on August 5 and 6 at the South San Francisco Conference Center.

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Packard Children’s patient visits Capitol Hill to advocate for kids with complex medical conditions

On the heels of his preschool graduation, 4-year-old Tyler Briend kicked off his summer vacation by traveling to Washington D.C. to speak with lawmakers about improving health care access for kids like him – patients living with complex medical conditions. Tyler, a patient at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and his parents made the trip as part of Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day, sponsored by the Children’s Hospital Association (CHA).

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Bob Zimmerman, volunteer “Cuddler” wins Visa Volunteer Award

Bob Zimmerman, volunteer “cuddler” at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and a full-time Visa employee, received the Visa Volunteer Award for January-July 2014. As part of his recognition, Visa is donating $5,000 to the hospital in a salute to the work of cuddlers and other volunteers.

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Nurse Linda Ritter Receives Prestigious Award for Excellence

Recently, nurse.com honored Linda Ritter, RN, as winner of the 2014 California’s Giving Excellence Meaning (GEM) Award in the category of Clinical Nursing, Inpatient. Ritter, a longtime nurse in the Bass Childhood Cancer Center at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, was noted by the organization for her leadership in improving palliative care education for the entire unit.