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“Fun Helps Us Heal” – Time for Transplant Camp

Fifty Stanford Children’s Health transplant patients are spending the week at camp having fun while still getting the medcial care they need. Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford is a national leader in pediatric organ transplantation. We sponsor this camp to give kids who have received a transplant a chance to enjoy being children and to connect with other kids like them.

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The power of organ donation

April is Donate Life Month, and 14-year-old Sina Sulunga-Kahaialii of Hawaii is living proof that organ donation saves lives. She recently received a kidney transplant at our hospital due to chronic renal failure.

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Surgery to find your voice: A Q&A with a pediatric otolaryngologist

When we’re in a noisy restaurant, it’s really difficult to hear my young niece speak. She can only talk very quietly, because she has a paralyzed vocal cord. But Stanford’s Anna Messner, MD, is bringing hope to kids like her via a rare surgery that attaches more nerve fibers to the affected vocal cord.

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Phoenix baby saved by heart surgery pioneer

Baby Jackson Lane’s heart problems were “about as dramatic as you can get.” Famed surgeon Dr. Frank Hanley and his team stepped in to save Jackson’s life. “We are just so lucky that we found Dr. Hanley and that our son fought for his life,” said mom Elyse.

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Growing for Tomorrow

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital is embarking on a transformative expansion project. Growth will allow Packard to continue to offer the most advanced cures, treatments, and technologies available, performed by the best minds in pediatric and obstetric medicine, within a state-of-the-art facility designed to meet the special needs of children and families.

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Appetite for Life

Caitlin Burns was born with an immune deficiency and pseudo-obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, a life-threatening condition that prevents the normal movement of food through her intestines. Packard specialists have been caring for her since she was an infant.

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Less is More

With her graduation just around the corner, a new job, and plans for college in the fall, Megan Acaccia has a lot to celebrate.

But just a year ago, things did not look so bright for the 18-year-old San Jose native. At 5 feet 3 inches tall and weighing more than 300 pounds, Megan was morbidly obese. She was so bullied at school that she stayed at home for a month, and she suffered through bouts of vomiting, diarrhea, and night sweats. Requiring seven kinds of daily medications, she battled hypertension, arthritis, acid reflux, polycystic ovary syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea—all a result of her excess weight.

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Three Days, Three Hearts

In an extremely rare three-day series of transplants in May, three young adults received new hearts at the Children’s Heart Center at Packard Children’s, including an extraordinarily uncommon double-organ heart and liver transplant.