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June 1–7 marks National CPR-AED Week

Lynda Knight, MSN, RN, CPN shares information about the hospital’s Revive Initiative and the program’s goal to increase awareness of the importance of learning CPR and knowing how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED).

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Keeping kids connected thanks to one patient’s dream

When young patients move into Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford for treatment for cancer, transplant surgeries, or other acute conditions, their academic and social lives become secondary to their health needs. To bridge that gap, the Omar’s Dream Foundation is working with Packard Children’s to keep kids connected by donating laptops and other electronic devices that enable them to stay in contact with their classrooms and curriculum while in the hospital for extended periods of time.

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Training for safer patient transport

“We see tremendous value in using simulation training to enhance our skills and improve patient safety during critical care transports.” Andrew Palmquist, RN Patient Care Manager for Medical Transport.

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Packard Children’s patient visits Capitol Hill to advocate for kids with complex medical conditions

On the heels of his preschool graduation, 4-year-old Tyler Briend kicked off his summer vacation by traveling to Washington D.C. to speak with lawmakers about improving health care access for kids like him – patients living with complex medical conditions. Tyler, a patient at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and his parents made the trip as part of Speak Now for Kids Family Advocacy Day, sponsored by the Children’s Hospital Association (CHA).

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Why Babies Don’t Have Freckles

Freckles are a phenomenon that occurs when genetically predisposed people (often those with fair skin, red hair, and light eyes) are exposed to UV light over time, according to Joyce Teng, MD, director of pediatric dermatology for Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

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Video Game Technology and Surgical Expertise Meet in Groundbreaking Tool at Stanford Children’s Health to Help Parents Understand Complex Heart Repair

One of the most complex birth defects of the heart—and one of the most challenging to repair—can now be easily understood through a groundbreaking, video-game-like graphic now available on the Stanford Children’s Health website. It’s the first in a series called “Moving Medicine: An Interactive 3-D Look at Conditions and Treatments.”

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Side effects of childhood vaccines are extremely rare, new study finds

As you may have heard about elsewhere, a new paper published today on the safety of childhood vaccines provides reassurance for parents and pediatricians that side effects from vaccination are rare and mostly transient. The paper, a meta-analysis appearing in Pediatrics, updates a 2011 Institute of Medicine report on childhood vaccine safety. It analyzed the results of 67 safety studies of vaccines used in the United States for children aged 6 and younger.